Articles, news and updates related to best practices by GamEffective

gamification forecast

Will 80% of gamification projects fail? Giving credit to Gartner’s 2012 gamification forecast

The world of enterprise gamification has two oft-quoted statistics, and they are quoted all too often. The first often-quoted statistic is that about 70% of employees are disengaged.The second most quoted statistic about gamification comes from Gartner. In late 2012, at the top of the hype cycle about gamification, Gartner came out with a press release titled “80 Percent of Current Gamified Applications Will Fail to Meet Business Objectives Primarily Due to Poor Design”. This is the second most quoted statistic. We decided to take a look at Gartner’s report then and see how it fared.

micro training gamification

Morsels of learning: about micro-learning and gamification

Micro learning breaks learning into small bites, replacing or complementing long-form training and learning. It uses small, well-planned units, to deliver training and learning to users, when and where they want it.
With our attention becoming similar to that of a goldfish, micro-learning helps in training and information retention. It also works well with gamification implementations, with micro learning being recognized and prompted contextually.

Five sales gamification leaderboard mistakes and how to fix them

Granted sales people thrive on competition, however the problem is that leaderboards tend to be misused with disastrous consequences. The good news is that once you’re aware of these epic fails, the damage is reversible and you’ll be less likely to repeat the same mistakes.

So, how do you know if your sales leaderboards are doomed? Simply ask yourself if you’re doing these five major mistakes:

Job Essence in Customer Service & Gamification

Recently, we have been taking the time to think more about Customer Service and Gamification. We feel that customer service gamification in call centers is so much more than giving employees rewards for completing basic activities; it is certainly more than a variety of competition-centric game mechanics. Why is that? The answer is simple: simplistic gamification of customer service tasks has nothing to do with delighting customers or customer service employees.

Our Best Content of 2014 – most read, most shared!

If we take a look back at our 10 most popular blogs over the past year, it’s clear that the face of enterprise gamification is changing – and for the good! Gamification was always about bringing out the best in employees but the “how” is changing. We thank you for your feedback and shares, it motivates us to work harder on more blog posts you’ll love to read throughout 2015!

Goal setting science: why a high-low goal range works better

Which New Year resolution works better? “I will lose 3 pounds” or “I will lose 2-4 pounds”?
When thinking of goals, we tend to focus on the one number: the number of pounds we want to lose, the number of calls a sales rep should make, the number of training courses an employee should complete. But focusing on one number can be wrong.

Recent research shows that people are more likely to reengage (i.e. decide to continue pursuing a goal over a period of time) if the goal is a range and not a single number.

How to implement an enterprise gamification project in 2-5 weeks

To give you a good sense of the project phases of an enterprise gamification project, we’ve decided to share our own project plans and charts. You can use them as a reference point for any gamification project you choose to implement, since it outlines the main phases in implementing a gamification project.

The typical project, from beginning to actual launch should take 2-5 weeks, depending on the complexity of the process.