Articles, news and updates related to employee engagement by Gameffective

gamification forecast

Will 80% of gamification projects fail? Giving credit to Gartner’s 2012 gamification forecast

The world of enterprise gamification has two oft-quoted statistics, and they are quoted all too often. The first often-quoted statistic is that about 70% of employees are disengaged.The second most quoted statistic about gamification comes from Gartner. In late 2012, at the top of the hype cycle about gamification, Gartner came out with a press release titled “80 Percent of Current Gamified Applications Will Fail to Meet Business Objectives Primarily Due to Poor Design”. This is the second most quoted statistic. We decided to take a look at Gartner’s report then and see how it fared.

Gamification analytics matter a lot. More than ROI or KPIs.

Done well, gamification provides context, calls-to-action and a sense of meaningful work to employees – but the core question remains. How can companies get to the “gamification done well” phase? Some of it lies in good gamification design, using sound principles within the context of an organization or role and the desired employee behaviors. But some of it lies in using gamification analytics properly – and this is the core of this blog post.

You ain’t seen nothing yet: enterprise gamification in 2015

A review of Enterprise Gamification Consultancy’s Gamification Industry Report 2015, by lead researcher Mario Herger. The report (focusing on enterprise grade gamification, engagement and behavior modification platforms) reviews the state of the gamification world in 2015, marking its long-expected maturation from the novelty or exotic into a mainstream offering by large software vendors.

Since I’ve been following Mario’s work for a while, and since I think the report has some valuable points to make, here are five take-aways from the report.

New Insights for Enterprise Gamification … in 2015 & beyond!

Enterprise gamification is well into its 2.0 days. It is no longer (never was) about flying birds – it is evolving to encompass thinking about performance management methodologies; the use of gamification as an activity tracker ; a deeper understanding of employee motivation; and the use of game narratives. In fact, some would say that enterprise gamification is becoming the new corporate performance management.

Our Best Content of 2014 – most read, most shared!

If we take a look back at our 10 most popular blogs over the past year, it’s clear that the face of enterprise gamification is changing – and for the good! Gamification was always about bringing out the best in employees but the “how” is changing. We thank you for your feedback and shares, it motivates us to work harder on more blog posts you’ll love to read throughout 2015!

Employee Engagement is Not a Scam

Liz Ryan, Founder and CEO of Human Workplace, tells us in a LinkedIn post that employee engagement is a scam.

Here’s a quote from her LinkedIn post “The Employee Engagement Scam”

“Employee engagement is a fake business term that cropped up about twenty years ago because consulting firms and software firms saw something new that they could scam leaders into measuring.

Measurement is an addiction for fearful business and institutional weenies. They can’t stop measuring things because it makes them feel that they’re in control. When the measurements hit established targets, they feel cozy inside.

Employee engagement is typically measured via a once-a-year employee survey. The employees get to fill out a survey to tell their management team how ‘engaged’ they are, as though ‘engagement’ were a real thing instead of a made-up construct devised to give HR people something to measure.”

Reading this, I had a surge of contradictory thoughts.

Can Gamification replace corporate performance management?

Imagine a trucking company.
Let’s think about how its managers are engaged in meeting corporate goals. They are presented with a business strategy and goals. Let’s say the company has decided it should invest in better customer service, focus on a certain region and resolve a history of safety issues that are mostly related with too many hours of driving. Additionally, the company would like to better control its fuel expenditures by having trucks rest during rush hour traffic.

For over a decade, many enterprises have practiced engaging managers with corporate business strategy and goals. Managers undergo a process to acquaint them with the business strategy (often achieved with the use of learnification strategies) after which KPIs and targets are set, together with scorecards (to provide feedback) and recognition mechanisms. Management achievements are then reviewed discussed and rewarded in ritualized quarterly business reviews and more. This process of translating the business strategy into measurable goals for each manager is crucial to a well-functioning enterprise. Can gamification also achieve the goals of corporate performance management systems?

Using The Employee Engagement Funnel and Gamification For Business Transformation

The employee engagement funnel doesn’t have a lot of employees coming in and less qualified and able employees coming out of the other side. It symbolizes how employees are made aware of corporate goals, learn about the corporation and change the way they do their job. Eventually, the process makes employees more aware and helps them do better. As employees go through the engagement funnel, the organization needs to offer different tools for each stage in order to optimize the process.

Completion vs Competition – Which is better for Enterprise Gamification?

I recently overheard an interesting conversation between two friends that are triathletes. One of them was very excited about an upcoming race: he’s in better shape than last year, he said, he’s hoping to get to one of the top three results for his age bracket. The other friend, who has just begun training a year ago, on doctor’s orders (he was in bad shape before that) said “I’m into completion. Not competition”.

Re-Inventing Learnification and Knowledge Collaboration: An Interview with Dr. Eran Gal

We asked Dr. Gal to share his insights about what motivates employees, what types of gamification work better than others and what obstacles a company might confront when implementing gamification. Since Dr. Gal is an e-Learning expert, the focus of the interview was on Learnification. Learnification means using Gamification techniques for the purposes of training or employee on-boarding; the use of game mechanics promotes learning, review of materials and encourages a sense of completion. It also provides clear calls-to-action during the process of learning, and is more effective than traditional methods. By creating inherent incentives to learn, implementation of learnification projects promotes better employee knowledge and satisfaction.